Sinai Film/Book Series

Sinai Film

Once a month on Thursdays at 7:00 pm. Zbigniew Banas will lead a discussion of a current film. Participants view the movie in the theatre and meet to discuss the film at Sinai. The cost of S15 per person includes coffee and dessert.  For more information please email Marty Farkas, mjfarkas10@gmail.com. 

October 4 | The Wife" starring Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce
"The Wife' shows how the award of the Nobel Prize impacts a long married couple. According to the Washington Post it's "a handsome production that delicately skewers literary-world pretensions and Great Man mythmaking" and gives us "a chance to observe one of the finest actresses of her generation working at the very top of her shrewd, subtle, superbly self-controlled game."

Book Series

Join fellow congregants for an exploration of both fiction and non-fiction books of Jewish interest on the second Tuesday of each month at 2:00 pm in the Sinai Library. 

For more information please email Marty Farkas, mjfarkas10@gmail.com.

October 9: Less: A Novel by Andrew Sean Greer
A struggling novelist travels the world to avoid an awkward wedding in this hilarious Pulitzer Prize-winning novel full of "arresting lyricism and beauty" (New York Times Book Review).
Who says you can't run away from your problems? You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can't say yes--it would be too awkward--and you can't say no--it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world. You accept them all. Leader: Marty

November 13: Dinner at the Center of the Earth: A novel by Nathan Englander
"A kaleidoscopic fairy tale of Israeli-Palestinian reconciliation... One of the exhilarating aspects of Dinner at the Center of the Earth is its expansive sense of space and time...The effect is to heighten events, to transcend history in favor of a more allegorical realm...Englander has built a complex structure, by which his narrative reveals itself in pieces, and the less we know in advance, the more vividly we feel its turns...with this novel he frames history as both an act and a failure of the imagination, which is to say, in inherently, and inescapably, human terms."
—Los Angeles Times Leader: Arlene

December 11: Warlight: A novel by Michael Ondaatje
In a narrative as beguiling and mysterious as memory itself--shadowed and luminous at once--we read the story of fourteen-year-old Nathaniel, and his older sister, Rachel. In 1945, just after World War II, they stay behind in London when their parents move to Singapore, leaving them in the care of a mysterious figure named The Moth. They suspect he might be a criminal, and they grow both more convinced and less concerned as they come to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women joined by a shared history of unspecified service during the war, all of whom seem, in some way, determined now to protect, and educate (in rather unusual ways) Rachel and Nathaniel. But are they really what and who they claim to be? And what does it mean when the siblings' mother returns after months of silence without their father, explaining nothing, excusing nothing? A dozen years later, Nathaniel begins to uncover all that he didn't know and understand in that time, and it is this journey--through facts, recollection, and imagination--that he narrates in this masterwork from one of the great writers of our time.

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